Monthly Archives: February 2017

Warrior Soul, Last Decade Dead Century (1990)

Part three of Thunderegg’s hot new series, Albums I Reviewed in the High School Paper. This Microsoft Word 4.0 file was dated September 15, 1990.

Warrior Soul
Last Decade Dead Century

“You live for nowhere
You live for garbage
You live for hatred
You live for your own little twisted underprivileged morsels…
A lost existence.”

After listening to Last Decade Dead Century, Warrior Soul’s debut album, one may gather that the group is…hmm, maybe…pissed off? What’s most interesting, though, is that when other bands tend to complain about government and oppression, Warrior Soul aims its grumpiness at every single person living in the world. Like a cynical great-grandfather, this band hates everybody (except, possibly, “The Losers”) and makes no apologies for its behavior.

But that’s what makes Last Decade Dead Century so fantastic. The lyrics are complimented perfectly by the waves of knashing guitars that, due to their holy loudness, may only be compared with the clout of Soundgarden. Vocalist Kory Clarke’s delivery is, quite suitably, packed with enough angst to power a metropolis, and the rhythm section is unrelenting in its throbbing attack.

Every song on the album is a delightful cross-breed of political consciousness and straight-out groovalistic metal. If you’re looking for a smarmy, Aerosmith-esque power ballad, you won’t find it here: But if Kick-Out-the-Jams metal plod is your bag, you need go no farther. Tracks like “Superpower Dreamland,” “In Conclusion,” and “Downtown” hold a brilliant feel for melody while keeping their grungy outlook—while some tracks, like “Trippin’ on Ecstasy,” could even, ultimately, find their way to the world of Dancefloor Hell.

In the unfair world of metal, it is hard to say whether a “real” band such as Warrior Soul (as opposed to a “glam” band like Warrant) will gain mass acceptance. If Faith No More’s recent popularity gives any indication, Warrior Soul might have a chance.

But due to its cynical nature, it is doubtful that Warrior Soul would give a damn anyway. Buy it.

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Bullet Lavolta, The Gift (1989)

Part two of Thunderegg’s hot new series, Albums I Reviewed in the High School Paper. This Microsoft Word 4.0 file was dated May 21, 1990.

Bullet Lavolta
The Gift

After listening to singer Yukki Gipe’s ear-piercing, mind-bending shriek in the beginning of the track “Over the Shoulder,” it is easy to tell that Bullet Lavolta is indeed a very special band. The Gift, a thirteen-song combination of both new and prereleased works, is a masterpiece of sheer loudness—a solidarity of punk and melodic hard rock that can make any listener’s hair (and parents) stand at attention. Ken Chambers, one of two domineering guitarists, was originally frontsman for Boston’s Moving Targets, considered by WPRB disk Jockey Jon Solomon to be “the best rock band in the twentieth…well, the eighties.” The album starts with a bang. “X Fire” simply kicks with its rocking riffs and Gipe’s accompanying walloping vocals. The second song, “Over the Shoulder,” fascinates with its rhythmic tacets that last just long enough for the listener to do a windmill on his air guitar. (Incidentally, it was these two songs that were in this reviewer’s head during his little bicycle accident. Maybe the tunes’ energy contributed to his reckless cycling, but this will never be proven.) Other cuts, like “One Room Down,” “Trapdoor,” and the title track do little to diminish the conception that this Beantown quintet knows nothing better than high decibel ranges. Of all the songs, though, “Blind to You,” while just as clamorous as the others, tends to stand out because of its dark mood and dynamic transition. The Gift, put simply, rocks. Buy it and cherish it.

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Trouble, s/t (1990)

Part one of Thunderegg’s hot new series, Albums I Reviewed in the High School Paper. This Microsoft Word 4.0 file was dated February 15, 1990.

Trouble
Trouble

Although not quite world-renowned yet, the new metallic group, Trouble, has already gained quite a following in homeroom 274. Combining the sheer thunder of Metallica with a vast sense of melodic flow, Trouble should become one of 1990’s most popular bands. The album reaches out and straps the listener into his seat from the opening chord of “At the End of My Daze,” and does not release its hold until the final chorus of “All Is Forgiven” has faded. “At the End” features the menacing two-guitar attack and fantastic rotating stereo solos that have evolved into the group’s trademark. “The Wolf” could serve as a lullaby until its face changes to that of a very loud, though still tuneful, plea against war. (Yes, the group’s one problem seems to lie in the clichés of its lyrics.) Still, the song is excellent, and the words, ringing from the Robert Plant-like tones of Eric Wagner aren’t all that easily understood anyway. Other powerful tracks include “R.I.P.” and “Black Shapes of Doom”—both of which I had to turn up to maximum volume. Like Metallica, the members of Trouble have no difficulty in writing slower, more mellow songs. “The Misery Shows (Act II)” could become a classic, with as much Pink Floyd influence as Black Sabbath. “All is Forgiven,” though slightly more intense, presents brilliant guitar licks that are both tight and melodic. This album rocks. Buy it.

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